Teen Blog

Wed, 04/14/2010 - 11:35am

The results are in! Our first ever Teen Video Contest brought us six funny and informative videos, all made by our super-talented local teens. The theme was, “Why My Library is Important to Me.” From dogs who know best to fireside chats, each video was unique and enjoyable. We applaud all the great work! What was most heart-warming was seeing how many ways our teens use and appreciate the Central Rappahannock Regional Library. Some pointed out that it’s a safe place to hang out with friends or work on group projects. Many admired the free Internet access, computer use, databases and online searching. They see their library as a quiet study retreat, a place to get professional research help, and most of all, a treasure trove of free books, music, and movies.

So, without further ado, here are the winners.

In first place, receiving the prize of a Flip digital video camera is Erik Martinsen, creator of the video, “Libraries are Doggone Fun!”


Wed, 01/25/2012 - 10:54am

View the winning entries from our Teen Tech Week Video Contest held in March 2010.

First Place: Libraries are Doggone fun!

The first place winner received a Flip video camera.

Thu, 03/25/2010 - 3:56pm

It was awesome! Were you there? It was on Friday, March 12, 7-9 pm. It was in the Headquarters theater.

Thanks to all the musicians and, hey, you can check them out on MySpace Music: Proof by Assertion, Ambulance Review, and 52 Foreign Dumpsters! (You all were great and you know it!)

Check out this video of Proof by Assertion at Salem Church last August.

You can also see The Ambulance Review performing "No Way!" Says FAA on MySpace.

Fans, you were great, too! Wouldn't be a show without you all! Mark your calendars for the next show at Headquarters: Friday, June 11

Tue, 03/23/2010 - 4:00am

 “He was not sure exactly when he became a child of the forest,” but 13 year-old Samuel, the hero of Gary Paulsen’s new book Woods Runner,  has a profound gift for hunting and understanding “sign” in the wild. Not only does Samuel supply meat for his parents, but he is the main hunter for the frontier community in which he lives.

Samuel is part of two worlds – the green world of the forest, “unimaginably vast, impenetrable, mysterious and dark,” and the world of civilization, of shelter and books and contemplation. On the frontier of western Pennsylvania, life is rigorous, brutal, and often violent.  Samuel’s life as hunter and provider seems peaceful, until the fateful day when he is out hunting and smells “wrong” smoke on the wind from the direction of his home. He fears that something has happened to his parents, and runs the eight miles home in a panic.