Kids Blog

03/22/2017 - 8:30am

Whether leaping through the vines of a rainforest or the pages of a book at the library, monkeys have lots to teach us about the ways animals live, our responsibilities in caring for the last wild places, and just how to have fun.

I'll bet you know that monkeys are furry, cute, and swing in the trees, but there's so much more to learn about them:

A Monkey is NOT an Ape

Monkeys have tails, but apes do not. Chimpanzees, gibbons, orangutans, and gorillas are all apes. They use their powerful arms and legs to swing through the trees. Many New World monkeys from South America can use their tails like another hand to swing. Monkeys from Asia and India can't do that! Monkeys, apes, and humans are all part of a family group called primates.

03/07/2017 - 9:28am

How can you help the Earth?  There are lots of ways to get involved in conservation whether you're a kid, teen, or adult. Check out the local activities, Web sites and library materials listed below for some great ideas.

03/07/2017 - 9:42am

Boom!
One morning, the old wooden dam on the Rappahannock River went up in clouds of smoke. It was a huge thing—ancient and strong, built in layers to tame the river so that the power of the water pushing against it could provide electricity for the town. But it had been years since anyone tapped that power. Now, the dam was falling apart, and it was decided that it had become dangerous. So the Army Corps of Engineers blew it up one morning, and the river was flowing freely again—just as it had in previous centuries. By getting rid of the dam, the river had a chance to go back to being more like it once was. There would be more fish which would mean more birds, and, really more of everything.

03/01/2017 - 9:39am

Outside the wind is lifting just so, ruffling the new leaves on the trees and chasing the old ones away. It's spring, a time to celebrate the rebirth of the flowers and the greening of the trees. It's time to go fly a kite and watch it buck and soar in the breeze.

You can make a simple kite all by yourself, paint it or color it with markers, and let it fly up in the air. 

03/01/2017 - 9:39am
Leo and Diane Dillon: An Artful Marriage

Leo Dillon was fascinated by Diane Sorber before he ever laid eyes on her. It was one of her paintings that caught his attention. For he did not know of any other student who had that deft, expressive technique. He was curious and a little jealous. He had a rival, and he knew it.

03/02/2017 - 2:03pm
So I have this project...

"Oh, by the way... "

Those were always the words my parents dreaded hearing when my brother and I were growing up. Usually, because it meant that one, or both of us, forgot about an upcoming project. Luckily, for us and my parents, we usually remembered sooner rather than later—but sometimes we did push it kind of close.

It’s not uncommon for parents and kids to come rushing into the library the night before a project is due looking for information and inspiration—but have no fear! We have some amazing project books here at the library that can help out students in just this situation. My booklist by no means has every book that would help, but it features some of the lesser known ones. Now, without any further procrastination, check out my "So, I have this project..." booklist.

02/16/2017 - 10:21am
Focus on African American History

Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s Rappahannock Reads runs throughout the month of February and is an opportunity for everyone in the community to read and discuss the same book. CRRL’s 2017 Rappahannock Reads title is Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, by Margot Lee Shetterly, which tells the true story of the African American female mathematicians who went to work as “human computers” at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in Hampton, Virginia, during World War II.

02/16/2017 - 12:35am
Cover to Ada's Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood

“For me, the violin means everything . . . life.” —Ada Rios

In Ada Ríos’ hometown of Cateura, Paraguay, trash is a way of life. The landfill is a source of income for the gancheros, or recyclers, who spend the days picking through trash to find cardboard or plastic to sell. As a young girl, Ada wondered if she, too, would grow up to work in the landfill. Most people in her town did. Little did she know that trash would be a large part of her life in a completely unexpected way.

02/16/2017 - 10:26am
Do You Have a Child in Kindergarten?

Between now and March 31, kindergarten students who visit any branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library are invited to stop by a Youth Services desk where they can choose a free book—just for being in kindergarten!

Once a year, we give books away to all kindergarten students in order to encourage their love of reading, fuel their imaginations, and add building blocks to their growing reading skills.

03/01/2017 - 8:59am
Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

Born on March 2, Dr. Seuss is the beloved author who brought us such favorite characters as the Grinch, Horton, and the Cat in the HatJoin us for fun-filled activities in honor of Dr. Seuss' birthday!
 

Pages

Subscribe to Kids Blog