My Librarian

05/26/2017 - 12:41pm
Cover to Devotion: A Memoir by Dani Shapiro

Some people find faith in a blinding flash, like Saul/Paul on the road to Damascus. For others, this can be a lifelong journey.  Share the various roads followed (and destinations found!) on the these spiritual journeys of finding and losing faith, returning to church, searching for meaning or experiencing profound spirituality outside of organized religion in the updated booklist, Soul Searching.

05/23/2017 - 1:32pm

The Owl and the pussy-cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.

The Owl and the Pussycat is a funny sort of poem indeed and only one of Mr. Lear's many nonsense verses. Anyone who would travel along with a Pobble who has no toes or take a sail in a sieve with the blue-handed Jumblies is welcome to be a friend of Mr. Lear.

05/12/2017 - 8:41am
Cover to Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origins of American Comics

If you love comics and want to be entertained, you really need to check out Christopher Irving’s (words) and Seth Kushner’s (pictures) Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origins of American Comics. It’s a bright and brilliant introduction to the people who brought stories of brave deeds to American audiences through their work.  Here’s a snippet from his sketch on Will Eisner (The Spirit):

04/27/2017 - 12:11pm

Officially, May Day is the 1st of May, but really anytime during this splendid spring month is a perfect opportunity to share small gifts of the season with everyone: teachers; friends; neighbors; and family. You can do that with May baskets—a wonderful, old-fashioned tradition.

04/27/2017 - 2:24am
Cover to If You Love Honey: Nature’s Connections

This bright picture book is a great introduction to how nature works for rather young children. If You Love Honey traces the connections between the wild world and its inhabitants from honey to honeybees to dandelions to ladybugs to goldenrod to . . . well, you get the idea.

Cathy Morrison’s detailed illustrations give kids a friendly look at the natural world. The animals and plants that rely on each other to thrive might be found every day in your neighborhood park, but the vivid colors and sharp lines put them in the spotlight for story time.

04/26/2017 - 8:43am
Panda Pants by Jacqueline Davies

Pants are warm. Pants are soft. Pants are for pandas? No, absolutely not, according to the adult panda in Panda Pants, by Jacqueline Davies. But baby panda desperately wants a pair of pants—with pockets, please!

As parent and child wander through the bamboo forest debating the merits of pants, sharp-eyed readers may notice the tell-tale signs of danger stalking the pair. When a leopard attacks, will it be the end of our pandas? Or, can quick-thinking baby panda save the day . . . with a little help from a pair of pants?

04/24/2017 - 2:21am
Cover to The Girl in a Cage

As darkness falls, Marjorie hopes the children will not come again. With their taunts and rotten turnips for throwing, they harass her as much as they can, and there isn’t anything the princess, hanging in the filthy cage in the monastery courtyard, can do about it. To them, Marjorie is simply The Girl in a Cage.

04/19/2017 - 9:49am
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

“It was June and long past time for buying the special shoes that were quiet as summer rain falling on the walks. June and the earth full of raw power and everything everywhere in motion.  The grass was still pouring in from the country, surrounding the sides, stranding the houses.  Any moment the town would capsize, go down and leave not a stir in the clover and weeds.  And here Douglas stood, trapped on dead cement and red-brick streets, hardly able to move.”

The opening piece in Ray Bradbury’s Dandelion Wine finds Doug Spaulding at the start of his twelfth summer, yearning for a pair of running shoes that will let him be a part of the glorious season. Like the dandelion wine bottled and stored in his grandparents’ cellar, the memories of that long-ago summer are preserved to be savored by his readers.

04/07/2017 - 9:19am
Cover to This Dark Endeavor

A slim volume of poetry was published in 1798; it was Lyrical Ballads, by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The formal language of verse was gone; the subject matter changed. The effect was similar to when punk rock burst on the rock scene in the 20th century. No more gods, nymphs, or royalty; beggars, the mad, wretches, and convicts peopled Romantic poetry. Revolution was in the air, with the recent overthrow of the monarchy in France and the establishment of Swiss and Italian republics. Coleridge wrote so enthusiastically about the onset of liberty in France and elsewhere the authorities took notice, and he was watched for many years by officers of the state. Radical personal lives and politics gave their words power not seen in previous formalistic poetry. This first generation grew more conservative as they grew older, especially Wordsworth; in 1810, he and Coleridge had a falling out. A second generation of Romantic poets were beginning to write, more radical in their outlook and writings.

04/06/2017 - 3:29pm
Sign with me, Baby!

Before having my daughter, I was on the fence about whether we would attempt to do sign language with her. I LOVE the look of ASL, but I wasn’t sure what the impact would be on her language development. Then I read that multiple studies have shown children who are signed to as babies have “larger vocabularies and stronger verbal language abilities later in life.*” Add that information to the fact that my aunt is an interpreter for American Sign Language, and my interest in ASL has grown exponentially over the last year.

Pages

Subscribe to My Librarian