All branches will be closed starting at 5:00 on Wednesday, November 22 to Friday, November 24 for the Thanksgiving holiday. eBooks, eAudio, and eMagazines are available 24/7!

Westmoreland County

03/01/2017 - 10:53am
Westmoreland Branches to Be Open More Convenient Hours

Starting March 1, no matter where customers live in Westmoreland County, they will be able to take advantage of library services during the hours we typically consider "normal" CRRL operating hours. Without any added costs, the Cooper, Montross and Newton branches will soon be open six days a week, with at least one library location open Monday through Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

Soon, Westmoreland County students with last-minute homework needs, adults who need to use a computer, and children needing books will be able to find an open library in their county every day but Sunday.

02/24/2017 - 10:08am
CRRL Guest Picks: Storyteller Daisy Howard-Douglas

February’s guest reader is Daisy Howard-Douglas, an educator, author, storyteller, and community treasure. She spent years as a teacher in Richmond schools, but she always maintained a strong connection with her childhood. Raised in the island town of Morgan City, Louisiana—and truly raised by a village—"Miss Daisy" enjoys sharing stories that draw on her wonderful early years, surrounded and supported by people in different generations.

03/14/2012 - 9:18am
A New Cache of Old Records

When I began began doing genealogical research many years ago, like all beginners I focused on marriage records, birth and death records--when they were available, and wills. Then came deeds and other land records, and through using them I discovered the world of "courts of chancery" and "chancery records."

Not all Virginia courts judged cases the same way, you see. Some courts decided cases based on written laws that either specifically allowed or specifically prohibited various actions in certain circumstances. There was in these courts no latitude for judicial interpretation; there were no "grey areas."

Other courts, however, dealt with issues of equity or fairness in a much more flexible way--Chancery Courts. These courts decided cases which codified law could not readily accomodate, and these cases were usually land disputes, divisions of estates, divorce petitions, and business partnership disputes.

Chancery Court files are filled with subpoenas, depositions of witnesses, affidavits and other items of enormous interest to genealogists!

The Library of Virginia in Richmond has been diligently digitizing and indexing old chancery records, covering cases from the early eighteenth century through World War I. The database now includes hundreds of thousands of items. Several jurisdictions of interest to us are already completed! You may now find and view online the scanned chancery records for Westmoreland County, 1753-1913; Caroline County, 1787-1849; and Culpeper County, 1829-1913. Others will be made available in due course.

10/28/2009 - 3:39pm

By Philip Vickers Fithian

From the Journal and Letters of Philip Vickers Fithian, A Plantation Tutor of the Old Dominion, 1773-1774

Editor's note: the spellings are to period and from Mr. Fithian's diary.

Fryday 24.

La[s]t night we had a Gust of Rain & Thunder; very acceptable—To Day in course Mr. Christians Dance happens here--He came before Breakfast—Miss Jenny Washington came also, & Miss Priscilla Hale while we were at Breakfast

10/28/2009 - 3:13pm

 On Sunday, April 24, 2005, the parade of 19th-century-era coaches came again to historic Stratford Hall, once home to two signers of the Declaration of Independence, a Revolutionary War hero, and Robert E. Lee. The triennial event is a major fundraiser for the National Historic Landmark in Westmoreland County.

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