LibraryPoint Blog

11/07/2016 - 11:43am
Need Some Homework Help?

If you are struggling with a homework assignment or need a little help getting started on a project, the library is here to assist you! Central Rappahannock Regional Library has one-stop shopping for students of all ages, with resources available online and in our branches. Our trained research staff is committed to connecting students with the information they need, with our print and eBooks, the many databases we have available, and our knowledge of children’s and teens' literature. Whether you need online tutoring through the Literati Public database or a personalized recommendation for a reading assignment, CRRL has got you covered. 

11/01/2016 - 7:05am
CRRL Guest Picks: Kickshaw's Kathy Craddock

"I certainly never imagined that when I opened Nourishing Traditions at our local library almost nine years ago that in less than a decade I would open the doors to a natural foods store, but I am certainly glad that I did."  — Kathy Craddock, owner of Kickshaws Downtown and Kickshaws Kitchen

Kathy lives in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, with her husband, two kids, chickens and three dogs. She and her husband, Richard, own Kickshaws Downtown Market and Kickshaws Kitchen in downtown Fredericksburg, focusing on local, organic products and foods for special dietary needs. Here, she shares her thoughts on some of her favorite books:

11/01/2016 - 12:51am
NaNoWriMo—National Novel Writing Month at the Library

National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, is an annual Internet-based creative writing project that takes place during the month of November, challenging participants to write 50,000 words of a new novel. If you're thinking of participating, you’ll find plenty of helpful writing tips at the library and on nanowrimo.org.

11/01/2016 - 12:51am
Nancy Tafuri

When Nancy Tafuri began her illustrating her own marvelous stories, she had a hard time at first finding a publisher who would believe in her work. Fortunately for the many, many children who have been delighted by her books, Nancy persisted, learning more about her craft while waiting to be published. Her books were successful, and they definitely found their young audiences. Eventually, the New York Times would call Nancy Tafuri “the Queen Mother of Warmly Soothing Animal Bedtime Stories.”

11/01/2016 - 12:51am

I knew the perfect column to appear in today’s paper would be one that focused on scary books. Just one problem: I don’t read very many scary books. I have some guilt over this because, as a librarian, I feel like I should read all types of books. And I try. I really do. But the truth is, I don’t enjoy scary books, and, while I advocate reading widely to stretch your mind and to be exposed to all the wonderful literature out there, I also think there are so many good books available that you shouldn’t spend time reading a book you really aren’t enjoying. So, I don’t read scary books unless I have to, like when I need to prepare for a book discussion group.

10/31/2016 - 9:05am

Although zombies have a long history of appearances in religion and folklore, interest in them as villains in horror films is largely confined to the second half of the 20th century. The explosion in zombie popularity is based on a characterization established by a single film and the fact that the original characterization of the zombi in African folklore and religion, as well as in earlier films, is dramatically different from that of the popular characterization from the 1960s onward. To understand zombies in both their original context and in the role they have come to take in popular culture requires an understanding of two divergent traditions.

10/31/2016 - 9:09am

The image of a cursed soul doomed to become a werewolf at the rising of a full moon is one of the most iconic concepts in horror. Unlike Dracula or the Mummy, the notion of a “wolf man” or “werewolf” was not cemented by one single actor, author, book, or horror series. It is instead a truly ancient concept dating back to the pre-literate sagas and legends told by Europeans centuries ago. 

10/31/2016 - 9:11am
Frankenstein’s creature has many differences from other popular monsters associated with Halloween. Rather than being based off an ancient legend, religious concept, or historical figure, his origin is solely literary in nature, being confined to one book. Despite this, public perception of the creature has changed greatly since the publication of the original novel, leading to wildly divergent styles and plotlines in its various film adaptations.
 
People’s perceptions of the creature have become so warped by time and decades of misleading film posters and article titles that most use the name “Frankenstein” to refer to the creature itself, rather than the scientist who created him!  An understanding of literary history is necessary to understand the truth of the creature’s tragic history and how decades of film adaptations changed him into the lumbering brute most know him as today.
 
11/10/2016 - 2:57pm
"What are you reading?" Wednesdays

Every Wednesday we ask "What are you reading?" on our Facebook page and Twitter account. Building a community of readers is at the core of our mission, and finding new and fun ways to do this is thrilling.

10/26/2016 - 12:29pm
https://librarypoint.bibliocommons.com/list/share/402855529_crrl_scottphillips/684148510

Louisa May Alcott did not write because she had the need to get the stories out. Louisa May wrote for one reason: she wanted her family to be rich.

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