Guys Read Too

09/26/2016 - 7:46am
If you like Looking for Alaska by John Green

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Looking for Alaska by John Green
Sixteen-year-old Miles' first year at Culver Creek Preparatory School in Alabama includes good friends and great pranks, but is defined by the search for answers about life and death after a fatal car crash. (catalog summary)
 

If you like John Green's style of writing, check out these other titles similar to his works.





The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time Indian
by Sherman Alexie
Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. (catalog summary)

 


 

 


All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
Told in alternating voices, when Theodore Finch and Violet Markey meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school--both teetering on the edge--it's the beginning of an unlikely relationship, a journey to discover the "natural wonders" of the state of Indiana, and two teens' desperate desire to heal and save one another. (catalog summary)
 

 

 

09/30/2016 - 3:00pm
Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine

Imagine a world where books are black market. Where the written word on printed paper is so illegal you could be killed for owning or sharing it. Sure, you can have eBooks delivered to you freely, but the chance that you are reading the author's original words are slim. For the Great Library, in order to make information available to many people and to protect the printed books themselves, controls the dissemmination of every last word.

09/19/2016 - 8:59am
The Squire's Tale by Gerald Morris

Gawain of Orkney doesn't need a squire. He's yet to make it to King Arthur's court to be knighted, and, if he does need a squire later, he has a few brothers in the hinterlands who will do. For his part, Terence is perfectly happy taking care of his foster father, the hermit Trevisant. He is a kind boy and an excellent cook, though granted a bit confused at present. Just recently the trees had started talking to him.

Trevisant, however, has other ideas. After a shared pot of excellent stewed rabbit, the hermit tells the pair that they are destined to achieve great things together. Terence tells Gawain that it must be so, since Trevisant has the gift to see the future as if it were the past.

08/25/2016 - 1:57pm
If you like Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Divided into the four marking periods of an academic year, the novel, narrated by Melinda Sordino, begins on her first day as a high school freshman. No one will sit with Melinda on the bus. At school, students call her names and harass her; her best friends from junior high scatter to different cliques and abandon her. Yet Anderson infuses the narrative with a wit that sustains the heroine through her pain and holds readers' empathy. A girl at a school pep rally offers an explanation of the heroine's pariah status when she confronts Melinda about calling the police at a summer party, resulting in several arrests. But readers do not learn why Melinda made the call until much later: a popular senior raped her that night and, because of her trauma, she barely speaks at all. Only through her work in art class, and with the support of a compassionate teacher there, does she begin to reach out to others and eventually find her voice. (catalog summary)

Here are some suggestions for books with school drama/situations and plots that keep you guessing at the ending:


 

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer
Jam Gallahue, fifteen, unable to cope with the loss of her boyfriend Reeve, is sent to a therapeutic boarding school in Vermont, where a journal-writing assignment for an exclusive, mysterious English class transports her to the magical realm of Belzhar, where she and Reeve can be together. (catalog summary)

 

 


 

 

By the Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead by Julie Anne Peters
High school student Daelyn Rice, who's been bullied throughout her school career and has more than once attempted suicide, again makes plans to kill herself, in spite of the persistent attempts of an unusual boy to draw her out. (catalog summary)
 

 

 

08/25/2016 - 11:32am
If you like Diary of a Wimpy Kid (for Teens)

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
Greg records his sixth grade experiences in a middle school where he and his best friend, Rowley, undersized weaklings amid boys who need to shave twice daily, hope just to survive, but when Rowley grows more popular, Greg must take drastic measures to save their friendship. (catalog summary)
 

If you're looking for a title similar title to Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but for teens and not kids, look no further! Check out this list of humorous, young adult titles.

 

 


Boys Don't Knit (In Public) by Tom Easton
After a brush with the law, Ben, a dyed-in-the-wool worrier, must take up a new hobby and chooses knitting, an activity at which he excels but must try to keep secret from his friends, enemies, and sports-obsessed father. (catalog summary)

 

 

 

 


House Arrest by K.A. Holt
Young Timothy is sentenced to house arrest after impulsively stealing a wallet, and he is forced to keep a journal into which he pours all his thoughts, fears, and frustrations. (catalog summary)
 

 

 

08/25/2016 - 12:05am
The Nest by Kenneth Oppel

"We've come because of the baby," she said. "We've come to help."

The Nest appeared soon after Steve's baby brother came home from the hospital, hanging from the eaves of the roof. Steve did not know exactly what was wrong with his new sibling, but he overheard his parents use words like "poor prognosis" and "degenerative." It was not long until Steve saw the wasps in his yard . . . and in his dreams.

08/19/2016 - 10:20am
If you like The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Sixteen-year-old Hazel, a stage IV thyroid cancer patient, has accepted her terminal diagnosis until a chance meeting with a boy at cancer support group forces her to reexamine her perspective on love, loss, and life. (catalog summary)

 

If you enjoy The Fault in Our Stars, you may enjoy these other Adult and Teen titles too: 

 

100 Days of Happiness by Fausto Brizzi
What would you do if you knew you only had 100 days left to live? So begins the last hundred days of Lucio's life, as he attempts to care for his family, win back his wife (the love of his life and afterlife), and spend the next three months enjoying every moment with a zest he hasn't felt in years. From helping his hopelessly romantic, widowed father-in-law find love, discovering comfort in enduring friendships, and finding new ones, Lucio becomes, at last, the man he's always meant to be. In 100 epigrammatic chapters, one for each of Lucio's remaining days on earth, it is as delicious as a hot doughnut and a morning cappuccino. (catalog summary)

 


Alice & Oliver
by Charles Bock
Alice Culvert is a force: passionate, independent, smart, and gorgeous, she--to her delight--attracts attention wherever she goes, even amid the buzz of mid-90s New York. In knee-high boots, with her newborn daughter, Doe, strapped to her chest, Alice is one of those people who just seem so vividly alive, which makes her cancer diagnosis feel almost incongruous. How could such a being not go on? But all at once, Alice's existence, and that of her husband Oliver, is reduced to a single purpose: survival. As they combat the disease, the couple must also face off against the serpentine healthcare system, the good intentions of loved ones, and the deep, dangerous stressors that threaten to push the two of them apart. (catalog summary)

 

06/01/2016 - 6:02am
Guest Picks: Ronnie Sidney II: Words That Heal

Ronnie Sidney II is a therapist, public speaker, entrepreneur, and author of Nelson Beats the Odds, a book to share with children that draws from his own early experiences with ADHD. Here, he answers our questions and shares reading selections that he has enjoyed and that have inspired him. 

If you could give one piece of advice to parents of a young child with ADHD, what would it be? 

My advice is for parents to support their kids’ strengths. Kids with ADHD have many gifts that are often overlooked because of their hyperactive or impulsive behavior. My father was a Baptist minister, and I was active in church activities that gave me an opportunity to speak.
Ever since kindergarten, I would get in trouble for talking excessively to my peers in class. In high school, teachers began seeing my talking as my strength and encouraged me to participate in forensics, debate, and other public speaking competitions. Today, I'm able to use my strength professionally as an outpatient therapist and professional speaker. 

10/19/2015 - 1:27pm
Books from Beyond

October has a special place in my heart. Pumpkins, changing leaves, cold weather, boots, and, of course, Halloween. Halloween is one of my favorite holidays. The idea of ghosts and all types of monsters is just fascinating to me. Which is interesting in itself because I really don’t like being scared. You’ll rarely find me watching a horror movie. But scary books—those I can do, and I love them. Here are some of my favorite creepy books.

My Librarian: Books from the Beyond.

10/19/2015 - 9:29am
Ask the Dark by Henry Turner

“Scuze my language.” — Billy, Ask the Dark

Billy Zeet has quite a reputation. And he got it the hard way—he earned it. Despite having a heart of gold, Billy’s rap sheet includes more petty crimes than even he can remember. He can silently break into a locked second-story window with one hand tied behind his back. And nobody can slip unseen through the dark like Billy. He’s practically a shadow. Nobody can skip school quite like Billy, either. Being the invisible man at school has put him in the seventh grade for the second time. But he has an expansive vocabulary—of cuss words.

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