Virginia Johnson

04/06/2017 - 2:07am
Cover to The Language of Angels: A Story about the Reinvention of Hebrew

What happens if no one speaks a language for nearly 2,000 years? Is it dead? Latin and ancient Greek are sometimes called “dead” languages because they are rarely spoken anymore. We still use both those languages, especially for worship services or studying science and literature, but most people do not talk to each other using either language every day.

It was the same for Hebrew, which has also been called “the language of the angels.” A Jewish scholar and father, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda was one of many Jews living in Palestine (part of the Ottoman Empire) in the 19th century, and he wanted to give the Jewish people who had drawn together from across the world a shared language, a language that reflected their faith.

06/20/2017 - 2:00pm
Identity Unknown: Rediscovering Seven American Women Artists

As an art student, Donna Seaman naturally studied artists of the past, thumbing through photographs and reading sketches of their lives and works. It didn’t take her long to figure out there was something wrong with these pictures. In too many, the male artists’ names were proclaimed, but the women, when they did appear, were simply listed as, “Identity Unknown.”

On a mission to make these women and their works known, Seaman did the research on seven whose art and lives were every bit as intriguing as their male counterparts. We meet the provocative sculptor Louise Nevelson, “The Empress of In-Between.” Her medium was wood, and she derived much inspiration from ancient cultures. The essay “Girl Searching” introduces Gertrude Abercrombie, whose specialty was edgy, emotional and autobiographical paintings. She cruised Chicago in her vintage Rolls-Royce and held jam sessions in her three-story Victorian brownstone, earning her title, “Queen of the Bohemian Artists.”

05/23/2017 - 11:34am

A Solid Beginning

Arnaud “Arna” Wendell Bontemps was born on October 13, 1902, in Alexandria, Louisiana, a child of middle class parents of mixed racial heritage—what is sometimes called Creole. His father, Paul Bismark Bontemps, was descended from French plantation owners living in Haiti and their slaves. After coming to the United States, the Bontemps family lived free in Louisiana for decades, and the many of the men worked as skilled brick and stone masons for generations.  In addition to working his trade, Arna’s father also played music with a popular band. Arna’s mother, Maria (pronounced Ma-rye-ah) Carolina Pembrooke was descended from an English planter and his Cherokee wife. Maria taught public school and enjoyed creating visual art.

05/23/2017 - 11:33am
Meeting Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is famous today for her memorable words. She should also be remembered for her indomitable spirit.

04/03/2017 - 8:43am
Cover to poemcrazy

Are you inspired by life, whether light or dark, to mark moments or passages with words that dance, shout, or whisper your personal truth? You might be poemcrazy. Author (and poet) Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge certainly is. In her book, she shares how she sees the world as a poet as she’s progressed from shy teen to mother to writing workshop presenter.

04/01/2017 - 2:03am
CRRL Guest Picks: Stephanie Lyles

Besides being a business development officer at NSWC Federal Credit Union, Stephanie Lyles is also on the board of the Leadership Colloquium at UMW, which prepares women to work toward "a lifetime of leadership." Winner of the Laurie A. Wideman Enterprising Woman's Award, Stephanie has been recognized as an "independent, energetic spirit" as well as being "ready to act in business and in the community, and lead with values of the highest level of integrity and honesty."

This month, Stephanie shares her personal and professional favorites with our library community.

03/31/2017 - 1:19pm
Cover to Prairie Day

Are you looking for warm and classic stories to entrance little ones? Introduce them to Laura Ingalls and her family with My First Little House Books. The original Little House series has been beloved for generations, so why, fans of the chapter book series might ask, do we want to look at a series rewritten and freshly illustrated for small children? Why not just read the original?

My First Little House Books have a different intended audience and therefore a different method of telling the story of the pioneering Ingalls family, who move from territory to territory, looking for a better life and being willing to work hard for it—but also having fun.

Perfect for a lap-sit storytime, these 14 books joyfully recreate the atmosphere of the original Little House books, while Renée Graf’s glowing illustrations faithfully follow and enlarge upon original illustrator Garth Williams’ gentle style.

03/29/2017 - 2:01am
Cover to Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life

The best science teachers bring their subjects to life. They intrigue and entrance their students, often by explaining how everyday events they have observed, such as swirling a dollop of milk in a cup of tea or coffee, are really quite similar to what happens elsewhere in the Universe on both a much larger and much smaller scale. By hooking their students’ interest in a relatable way, a great teacher can inspire them to see their world differently, to open their minds, and to understand the underpinnings of our daily lives.

03/27/2017 - 12:27am
Cover to Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

Sherri L. Smith’s Flygirl is an extremely moving historical novel about friendship, freedom, love, and loyalty.

Ida Mae Jones dreamed of doing something to help U.S. troops defeat the Nazis in World War II. She was young, smart, and knew how to fly an airplane. But that wasn’t enough, not even when they started accepting women to fly non-combat missions. Because Ida Mae was black, and only white women were allowed to join the flying service. So there was no way she could help win the war and bring her brother home all the sooner. Unless she broke the rules.

03/23/2017 - 5:23pm
Come Explore HQ's Teen Space

Teens, now you can find your own space at Headquarters Library in Fredericksburg. Come to the second floor, and see what’s in store.

The official Opening Night Pizza Party is set for Tuesday, March 28, from 7:30 to 8:30. The library’s Teen Council and HQ Youth Services staff will be there to welcome you. Besides delicious pizza, there will be:

15 brand spanking new Chromebooks available for checkout. During the party or at any other time the library is open, they can be used anywhere on the second floor and can be used with earphones for a bit of privacy. 

We'll also have XBox One with the following games: 

  • W2k17
  • Halo 5: Guardians
  • LEGO Jurassic World
  • UFC 2 Deluxe Edition
  • Terraria
  • Dragon Ball Xenoverse
  • NBA 2K16
  • Need for Speed: Rivals
  • Rocket League Arena

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