Shelf Life

Our Shelf Life Blog features the latest recommendations chosen by library staff and volunteers.
Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:42pm
Cover to Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor is nearly thirty years old. She lives alone and follows a strict schedule that includes work, talking to her Mummy, and avoiding contact with others. People attempt to help her unlock the issues of her past, but Eleanor maintains she is, in fact, completely fine. In Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, Eleanor tries to cope with abuse, neglect, and loss.

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:43pm

During World War II, victory gardens were important to Americans around the country. The steel and tin industry was working hard on supplying the army with weapons, so there were not enough raw materials to make these and tin cans for vegetables. Trains were being used to carry soldiers instead of civilian food supplies. And, to make matters worse, Japan controlled most of the rubber factories overseas, which meant there was no rubber for new tires on trucks that carried food across the country.

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:42pm
If You Like The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:42pm
Under the Sea by Kate Riggs, illustrated by Tom Leonard

Let Kate Riggs’ Under the Sea take you and your toddler on a dreamy trip to the ocean’s depths. Bonus! This is also a concept book, teaching relative positions—over/under, bottom/top, and so on. Clownfish wiggles OUT of an anemone. Octopus waits IN a dark den. Sea turtle swims AFTER jellyfish but BEFORE tuna. Learning these direction concepts and the names of sea creatures happens happily when accompanied by Tom Leonard’s lovely, glowing illustrations.

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:42pm
The Shadow Land: A Novel by Elizabeth Kostova

In 2008, a young woman from the Blue Ridge Mountains, who loves poetry and literature, arrives in Bulgaria. She’s been hired to teach English but has a month to explore on her own. Jet-lagged, at the wrong hotel and in need of rest and a shower, it’s not surprising Alexandra makes a terrible mistake while simply trying to help a family with their luggage. It’s not the first awful mistake she’s made, either.

In the late 1930s, a 20-something violin virtuoso, who has everything in the world to look forward to, slips back to his Bulgarian hometown on the eve of World War II. When the conflict is over, Stoyan Lazarov has very good reason to believe his talent will grant him fame. So what if he has to play second chair for now in a provincial orchestra? He has the love of his life, brilliant talent and enough patience. But musical genius though he may be, he has not factored in the crushing power of the political police.

In 2008, Alexandra’s and Stoyan’s paths will cross, and their separate, shameful secrets will be laid bare. Elizabeth Kostova’s The Shadow Land is at once a historical mystery and a modern thriller. There is true bravery and true love in this page-turner that spans decades, even as it illuminates an ancient country’s marvels and sorrows.

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:42pm
Stitches from the Garden by Kathy Schmitz

Kathy Schmitz does not believe in idle hands, as shown by her stitchery projects in Stitches from the Garden. She has clear instructions for 14 projects, including pillows, a bag, sachets, a pincushion, a journal cover, and a wrist bracelet. There are also instructions for the stitches used in each creation.

With romantic colors, she creates the colors, textures and shapes of nature. Birds perch, bees buzz, cherries hang from a tree, and lavender’s lacy shape all adorn her embroidery. Her table runner pattern has a garden full of flowers and insects stitched around the edge. Her artist’s eye captures the joys of a country garden with fabric and thread.

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