Kids

Monthly Highlights

Kids Blog

Tue, 12/12/2017 - 10:03am

Circles, squares, pentagons, octagons, polygons, angles, rays, points, and lines, there are so many names to learn in geometry. They may sound strange and new, but geometry is all around you. Your computer monitor's surface is more or less a rectangle, your pencil is roughly a cylinder, and, viewed from the top, the cable from your mouse to the computer, is a line segment.  Once you start thinking about geometric shapes, you'll find them everywhere.

Tue, 12/12/2017 - 10:02am

An aquarium is a watery world in miniature. It can be as complicated as you want or just a simple and safe place to keep a beautiful and patient pet. If you're new to fish keeping, you should start with the basics, but even beginners can have a terrific aquarium. Both beta fish (also known as Siamese fighting fish or bettas) and goldfish are good for first-timers. They're attractive and not so demanding of a special environment in order to thrive.

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 1:45pm
Fabulous Friday: I Survived

Young adventurers in grades K-6 will delight in mini survival challenges based on Lauren Tarshis’ extremely popular I Survived series. Like Tarshis' young protagonists fighting to survive historical disasters, Fab Friday attendees will find themselves faced with challenges.  They might build and test an “unsinkable” Titanic-style ship, create a marshmallow-toothpick structure subjected to the forces akin to those of the San Francisco earthquake, unearth a Lego city buried by Pompeii’s volcanic debris, and more. Even those who haven't read the I Survived books will be eager to get their hands on these disaster challenges!

Fri, 12/01/2017 - 2:08am
E.B. Lewis: Artistrator

"Artists need to fill themselves to overflowing and give it all back." -- E.B. Lewis

E.B. Lewis almost didn’t become an illustrator. Which means he almost did not open a visual pathway to African American culture and history that can be enjoyed by children in libraries and schools all around the country. He thought of himself as an artist, not an illustrator. When he thought of children’s book illustrations, he imagined pictures that were engaging, funny, sometimes almost cartoon-like. That wasn’t for him.

But an agent saw his work and insisted E.B. look at what was going on in children’s books now. As he sat in a bookshop, poring over the many wonderful books available for young audiences, he realized he wanted to be a part of this. He had been teaching art to special needs kids, a job he would have to set aside because publishers were hungry for his art to accompany the great stories they had already bought from the writers. He plunged into illustrating full time, sometimes working 15-to 18-hour days. He’s illustrated dozens of stories, including a Caldecott Honor book, and several projects have won the Coretta Scott King Award.

Pages