Kids

Kids Blog

Wed, 03/01/2017 - 9:39am
Leo and Diane Dillon: An Artful Marriage

Leo Dillon was fascinated by Diane Sorber before he ever laid eyes on her. It was one of her paintings that caught his attention. For he did not know of any other student who had that deft, expressive technique. He was curious and a little jealous. He had a rival, and he knew it.

Thu, 03/02/2017 - 2:03pm
So I have this project...

"Oh, by the way... "

Those were always the words my parents dreaded hearing when my brother and I were growing up. Usually, because it meant that one, or both of us, forgot about an upcoming project. Luckily, for us and my parents, we usually remembered sooner rather than later—but sometimes we did push it kind of close.

It’s not uncommon for parents and kids to come rushing into the library the night before a project is due looking for information and inspiration—but have no fear! We have some amazing project books here at the library that can help out students in just this situation. My booklist by no means has every book that would help, but it features some of the lesser known ones. Now, without any further procrastination, check out my "So, I have this project..." booklist.

Thu, 02/16/2017 - 10:21am
Focus on African American History

Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s Rappahannock Reads runs throughout the month of February and is an opportunity for everyone in the community to read and discuss the same book. CRRL’s 2017 Rappahannock Reads title is Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, by Margot Lee Shetterly, which tells the true story of the African American female mathematicians who went to work as “human computers” at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in Hampton, Virginia, during World War II.

Thu, 02/16/2017 - 12:35am
Cover to Ada's Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood

“For me, the violin means everything . . . life.” —Ada Rios

In Ada Ríos’ hometown of Cateura, Paraguay, trash is a way of life. The landfill is a source of income for the gancheros, or recyclers, who spend the days picking through trash to find cardboard or plastic to sell. As a young girl, Ada wondered if she, too, would grow up to work in the landfill. Most people in her town did. Little did she know that trash would be a large part of her life in a completely unexpected way.

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